More evidence - vehicles most dangerous space for second-hand smoke inhalation..


August 25, 2009 - Every parent wants their children to lead healthy and happy lives. There's an abundance of evidence that children are more susceptible to the negative effects of second-hand smoke (SHS, ETS, environmental tobacco smoke, involuntary smoking, sidestream smoke, passive smoking). As pointed out by Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) Australia in a February 2009 paper the evidence of second-hand smoke harm to children in enclose spaces is extensive and irrefutable. A Harvard School of Public Health report indicated that secondhand smoke in cars (auto, automobile, vehicle) can be up to 10 times more of a health risk than secondhand smoke in a home.

Vehicles have been found to be the most dangerous space for second-hand smoke levels. Kids exposed to smoke are at higher risk since they breathe in more air by weight than adults. Both the respiratory rate and heart rate are higher in children below the age of 13 than in adults. The younger the child, the greater the potential for exposure. Since the lungs of children are still developing, exposure to second-hand smoke can lead to ear infections, asthma, bronchopneumonia and other illnesses.


A Johns Hopkins School of Public Health study now provides further evidence on SHS exposure levels supporting smoke-free vehicles when passengers are present. The study, compared nicotine levels in the cars of 17 smokers and five nonsmokers whose commute to and from work took 30 minutes or longer. The researchers placed airborne nicotine samplers in the cars, one near the front passenger seat headrest and another in the back seat behind the driver. The researchers then analyzed the samples and found a twofold increase in concentrations of nicotine for every cigarette smoked. The authors estimate that nicotine concentrations are twice as high in smokers' cars as in other public and private places studied, and 40 percent to 50 percent higher than in restaurants and bars that allow smoking. "While partially opening windows reduced exposure to secondhand smoke it did not eliminate exposure within motor vehicles," co-author Patrick Breysse said. "It is important to remember that there is no known safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke."

People in the study also completed a questionnaire that included questions on their knowledge and attitudes about the health risks of secondhand smoke and relevant regulations and legislation. Both smokers and nonsmokers said smoking in a car posed a health risk to passengers. Among smokers, 53 percent said not being able to smoke in the car would help them to quit, and 93 percent said cars should be smoke-free voluntarily. Only 7 percent of smokers said there should be laws outlawing smoking in cars.

Breysse stated: "Results of this research and other studies can be used to develop education campaigns aimed at eliminating secondhand smoke exposure in motor vehicles. In addition, these results can be used to support legislative efforts aimed at banning smoking in vehicles, particularly when children are present."

PAPER: Secondhand tobacco smoke concentrations in motor vehicles, Miranda R Jones, Ana Navas-Acien, Jie Yuan, Patrick N Breysse, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Published Online First: 25 August 2009. ABSTRACT...

Dr. Norman H. Edelman, chief medical officer of the American Lung Association, said "all those people who smoke in cars and think they are protecting the passengers by using AC [air conditioning] or opening the window are wrong and potentially impairing their passengers' health." Matthew L. Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, called the new study "a rude wake-up call -- cars literally become toxic gas chambers." Myers also believes that laws banning smoking in cars are needed. "It is appropriate and necessary to ban smoking in cars where children are passengers," he said. "Children are not volunteers in cars. This is a more intense, more dangerous exposure to kids than in any other location."

Reference: Smokers' Cars Loaded With Nicotine Levels twice those found in places that permit smoking, study suggests by Steven Reinberg - HealthDay Reporter, Alegent Health, 8/24/2009.

Some related news briefs:
New South Wales politician smoking comment totally inaccurate..;
World Asthma Awareness Day..;
Further evidence - STOP smoking in the presence of your children..;
Ireland - ban smoking in cars when kids are present..;
Ontario law banning smoking in cars with children takes effect ..;
Maine - illegal to smoke in cars while children present..;
Ban on smoking in cars when children are present..;

Click on image to enlarge..

1 comments:

  generalsn1234567

August 26, 2009 at 8:25 AM

They need to reinstate wing vents. They really worked good for drawing smoke from a car.